Prepare Your Email Like It's Going For A Job Interview

Prepare Your Email Like It's Going For A Job Interview

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Kelsey Gregory
Published: 23rd March 2018

marketing to schools interview

Mere seconds. That's all the time it takes for potential employers to subconsciously decide whether they like you as you walk through their door. And that's exactly how your audience of teachers will receive your email. However, in the case of your fledgling email, if their first impression isn't positive, there will be no niceties, no small talk; they'll just hit "delete" and send it carelessly into cyber space. It's ruthless stuff.

So, to ensure that your next email to teachers stands out from all the other candidates, I've put together the following 8 interview tips...

1. Make an honest first impression

Ensuring your application stands up to scrutiny is crucial for any interview, and it’s the same with your email. Although there are numerous tricks you can deploy with your subject line in order to grab teachers’ attention, what's the point of these tricks if they fool people who aren't really interested in what you've got to offer into opening your email? Sure, you'll get a good open rate, but you'll annoy a lot of people who feel conned and they will probably unsubscribe as a result. The lesson: Be honest and keep it real.

2. Be enthusiastic and engaging

When the interviewer encounters a new face - or in our case, email - our brains subconsciously decide whether it's attractive, trustworthy and - most importantly - interesting, almost instantly. So… provide a dynamic Call to Action. There's a tiny window of micro-second opportunity, so you've got to make it count. Be sharp, be enticing. If used wisely, your email will get the VIP treatment, whilst others are left languishing in the inbox. Impress upon your reader a sense of urgency, make it exciting or time-critical, or present them with an offer they won't want to miss. It's a cut-throat world of snap decisions, where emails have got to be awesome, super-savvy, and equipped to break through the white noise.

3. Be polite, be friendly, make it a pleasure

In the interview, don't cross your arms. It's age-old advice, but it's there for a reason; you want to appear approachable. Likewise, your email must be effortlessly readable, conveying that there is an engaging and trustworthy human being at the other end that's on-hand to help teachers with any questions they may have. Teachers are much more likely to respond to emails if they feel like they have an idea who they're reaching out to, so be polite and make sure they know you'd love to hear from them.

4. Bring your portfolio with you

Teachers will want to see examples of your previous work, just like any good interviewer. Make sure you come prepared with testimonials and case studies. Demonstrate expertise, integrity, and why you're the go-to company or thought-leader. Make it compelling.

5. Don't ramble, be succinct and precise

Make sure it's snackable, or you interviewer will be looking at their watch. This is championed here at Sprint Education, and for good reason; no-one has time to read lengthy emails with flowery introductions. We recommend making content concise, to the point, and most importantly, easy to scan. This means putting the most vital information up front, and outlining the key selling points with numbers or bullet points. Likewise, ensure that it's easy for teachers to know what they've got to do to proceed so they're not confused about what they need to do next.

6. Go armed with quantifiable examples of the impact of your work

Any good interviewer will want to know some cold, hard stats about projects you've managed, sales growth you've contributed to, etc. Teachers are no different. Make sure your email gives facts and figures that are relevant, persuasive, and easy to understand.

7. Be prepared to answer tricky questions

An interview can often feel like an interrogation, so make sure you've done some research. When teachers are reading your email, try to pre-empt the questions that they'll be asking themselves… and make sure you've prepared the right answers. They are hard task-masters, and just like when you were at school, they'll be looking for you to trip yourself up.

8. Have a surprise up your sleeve

The candidates that make the best impression have something special to offer. During the interview they will go above and beyond, pulling out something unexpected that puts a big smile on the interviewer's face. If your email can nail this bit, it stands to bask in clickable glory!

So, let's sum up. Prepare your email like it's going for the most sought-after job in the country. It's going to have serious competition, rubbing shoulders with the best in the business, and there's an interview panel of experts who are notoriously critical and pressed for time. Be friendly, honest, and to the point. Don't be afraid to shout about the super skills you have that put you head and shoulders above the other candidates, but equally, make sure you can substantiate this with cold, hard evidence. Go armed with a rabbit in a hat. Not literally, obviously (because that would be plain weird); but something relevant that will set you apart from the others.

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Email Teachers Emailing Teachers How to Sell to Schools Marketing to Schools

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